The psychology of color

Color (or the lack of color) triggers a very powerful emotional response in us.  We can use insight as we select company colors, design logos, create ads, build websites and even create products.

Check out this fascinating infographic on how we react to color.

 

Bravo to CertaPro Painters for creating this and Cool Infographics for originally sharing it.

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Introverted or not – this guide is a must read!

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Lisa Petrilli’s guide for introverts

No matter what personality test I take, I tend to score off the chart on the extrovert scale.  I like big crowds, I’m comfortable speaking in front of thousands of people and I get a buzz from being at conferences, networking events and new situations with new people.

So you might think a book titled The Introvert’s Guide to Success in Business and Leadership would hold very little for me.  And boy, would you be wrong.  I learned quite a bit by reading Lisa Petrilli’s guide.

For readers who tend to be more introverted — you’ll learn how to create a strategy that leverages your strengths while navigate networking events, relationships with key team members, and how to connect with influential leaders who can help build/grow your career.

You’ll also learn how to make sure your ideas and good thinking sees the light of day in your organization.  Lisa also talks about how introverts can successfully motivate others, tackle decision-making, collaboration and asking for that raise or promotion.  There are some great tips on how to manage/maximize public events like conferences too.

As an extrovert — many of the suggestions applied to me as well.  I read the ebook, so I could highlight and take notes to my heart’s content! Plus, I gained a great deal of insight on how to work with introverts and help them bring their best to any project or team.

I’ve known Lisa for a few years and am more impressed with her as both a business leader and a person every day.  She’s a natural storyteller which makes her book a fun and fast read.  This would be a great read to fire you up as you get ready to take 2012 by storm.

You can buy the ebook by clicking here.

You can buy the Kindle version by clicking here.

And…you can buy the Nook version by clicking here.

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How/why we buy: Social commerce infographic

One of the best decisions I made as a college student was to get a Psych minor.  It certainly helps me be smarter when it comes to marketing, business ownership and life in general.  Besides, people fascinate me and I like understanding how they tick.

That’s probably why this infographic caught my attention.  It focused on the psychology behind how/why we buy and how social interactions influence those buying decisions.

Throughout the infographic, you’ll find little nuggets called psychological reasoning like “we have an innate desire to repay favors in order to maintain social fairness whether those favors were invited or not.”

Check this out… and then tell me which insight will be most helpful to you.

Tabjuice Psychology

Thanks to Stephania Andrade from TabJuice for making sure I didn’t miss this one.  If you’d like to share it with others, here’s the link to the original post.

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How to be creative on purpose

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…Do you need to be creative on demand?

My job is to be creative on demand.

The demands come in all forms.  It might be a strategy session for a client’s marketing plan, writing a print ad that will generate action or keeping the content on my blog, newspaper column or enewsletter fresh and worthwhile.

I don’t have the luxury of waiting for a muse to strike.  I’m always on deadline for something.  Which is why I was eager to pick up Todd Henry’s The Accidental Creative* (click here to buy) and learn as he promises in his subtitle…how to be brilliant at a moment’s notice.

There’s this myth out there that suggests that creativity comes from total freedom.  Well, I don’t know about you but I don’t know any professional today who lives in a world of complete freedom.  Instead, we’re called upon to be creative within the many constraints of life, world and our own habits, fears and obligations.

Todd explains that we all need to adopt the goal of being prolific, brilliant, and healthy. He explains why you need all three succinctly:

  • Prolific + Brilliant – Healthy = Burnout
  • Brilliant + Healthy – Prolific = Unreliable
  • Healthy + Prolific – Brilliant = Fired
  • Prolific + Brilliant + Healthy = Producing great work consistently

According to Henry’s book (and my own life experiences) there exists a creative rhythm deep in the heart of every individual, that is, “independent of the pressures and expectations you face each day.”

Establishing this rhythm will unlock your creative potential, provide you with the stability and clarity to tackle challenges, create and let your best thinking flow.

Your creative rhythm is set by how you structure and manage five key elements, the acronym for which is “FRESH.”

1. Focus

Most waste comes not from not doing the right work, but from doing the right work inefficiently. Clarity around objectives, separating the urgent from the important, is the springboard to effective creativity.

2. Relationships

Engaging with others is a powerful source of creative inspiration. Intentionally forging the right relationships with others gets you focused outwardly and frees you up creatively.

3. Energy

Think energy management, not time management. According to Henry, “it does you no good to micromanage your time down to the last second if you don’t have the energy to remain fully engaged for that time…you need to establish practices around energy management.”

4. Stimuli

Like any process, the output of the creative process depends on the input. Consistent brilliance demands that you be purposeful about what you’re feeding your brain.

5. Hours

Time is the currency of productivity. You must ensure that the practices that make you a more effective creative are making in onto your calendar.

It’s dandy to discuss all of this in theory but Henry really won my confidence when he provided practical weekly, monthly, and quarterly checkpoints at the end of the book to help put the five elements into practice.

Here are a few other key takeaways from the book:

  • How books should not be read as pure information but conversations like social media
  • The concept of the “Big Three” to allow you to focus on your critical creative goals
  • How to send messages to your brain to look for solutions

If you are involved in work that requires you to think and create for a living, The Accidental Creative will help you form and build your best ideas and manage the creative process and work that comes from it.

*Yup, it’s an Amazon Affiliate link.
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