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Do you have a crisis communications plan?

June 6th, 2011 · 5 Comments · Business owner/leader stuff, Strategy

 

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…You need a crisis communications plan

If you own your business, you probably have all kinds of insurance. You’ve protected your building, your equipment and depending on your field, you might have errors and omissions, liability or other insurances as well.

But 95% of you are missing one of the most vital insurances of all. This safety net could literally prevent the ruin of your organization. It’s a crisis communications plan.

Just like you can’t anticipate a fire or theft, you can’t possibly know when you’re going to face an accident, C-level misconduct, or misuse of your product that results in a death, tragedy or other news garnering disaster.

There are five must do’s for effective crisis communication planning. Be sure, as you draft your plan, to include all five aspects.

Be prepared: In today’s 24/7 world with continuous news channels, blogs, Twitter and other on demand media sources – you can’t afford not to be ready long before disaster strikes. Within minutes of the 2010 accidental death of the SeaWorld trainer – the news was already being shared on Twitter and YouTube videos were being uploaded. You do not have time to huddle up once the crisis has hit.

Listen and monitor: One of the best ways to prevent a wide scale communications crisis is to nip it in the bud. By identifying potential problems before or immediately after they surface, often you can mitigate a great deal of the damage. Create strategic listening posts that allow you to monitor what is being said about your company, your leadership, your products and your industry. This shouldn’t just be about monitoring social media. With so much of mainstream media producing content for the web – you need to keep a watchful eye on them as well.

Be human and be humane: It’s easy to get defensive and hide behind “no comment” or your lawyers. But when tragic strikes – your audiences (employees, community, customers, etc.) want to see and hear from you. They don’t expect you to be perfect, but they do expect you to genuinely care about what happened and how it impacts them. They want to hear from a real person who is being honest and forthright with them.

Over communicate: This is good advice in almost any situation but it’s critical at a time of crisis. You need to be very present, you need to offer regular updates and you need to repeat the same information in a wide variety of formats, media and potentially, time zones. Even if you don’t have anything new to report – don’t be dormant for too long. It makes people worry and wonder.

Create community: One of the best things you can do is to create a community of supporters and fans. That way, when you’re under fire, you’ll have a legion of people who will stand with you and help you fight off the attack. With the shift to “everyone can produce content” this becomes a vital part of your plan. You want lots of people singing your praises if/when you hit a bump in the road.

We’re going to dig into each of these five over the next couple weeks.  I’m really hoping that you tune in and take some action.

Unfortunately, most of you will disregard this advice and not put a crisis communications plan in place. And even more tragic – several of you, down the road, will sorely wish that you had.

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5 Comments so far ↓

  • David

    Hey Drew – you’re so right on this. I’d have to admit that for my small biz, I have virtually nothing in place for a crisis of this sort . . . or really of any sort.

    In fact, even on a much simpler level, I’ve realized how many things I manage for my business in my head – that aren’t written down anywhere. Simple services we use online, banking information, etc. Even a few hours spent on this stuff could save my partners months of work if I were to bite the big one prematurely or if a PR crisis hit.

    As to your “challenge” that I won’t follow through . . . I have it on my calendar to at least brainstorm on this for an hour :)

    Thanks for the not-so-gentle prod!
    David recently posted..Training to Be a Life Coach – Life Coaching Goals – Are They CompellingMy Profile

    • Drew McLellan

      David,

      It’s so easy, when you are working at breakneck speed, to keep everything in your head. The challenge of course comes from remembering it all accurately, everyone doing their own thing because the standards/expectations are still in your head and the inability to get some distance from the business.

      All good reasons to get your systems in writing, including that crisis communications plan!!

      Drew

  • Amelia@ International Business

    I find this advise to be very helpful in these times when social media penetrates almost all corners in the business world.

    Although it is possible to moderate comments on blogs and sites you own, you can’t control when there is a blogger or a community that gives bad reviews about your business, product or services. What’s worst is when this bad reviews are tied to your brand in search engine result pages.

    Crisis communications plan is a great advice and I would say businesses should consider this for PR purpose.
    Amelia@ International Business recently posted..Why Nokia outsourced Symbian developments to AccentureMy Profile

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